Oil and Gas Energy Developments and Changes in Crash Trends in Texas

Texas A&M Transportation Institute
http://tti.tamu.edu/2015/10/07/new-findings-more-new-oil-and-gas-wells-more-crashes-and-injury-costs/

…The total number of crashes decreased by 10 percent in the Barnett Shale region, increased by 1 percent in the Eagle Ford Shale region, and decreased by 4 percent in the Permian Basin region. As a reference, the number of crashes decreased by 7 percent in all other 175 counties in the state. However, these changes were not uniform either by crash location and type of vehicles  involved or by injury severity. There were also significant differences geographically within each region. In general:

  • ​Changes were more prominent for rural crashes. In the Barnett Shale region, the number of rural crashes decreased by 25 percent (compared to a 10 percent decrease overall in the region). In the Eagle Ford Shale region, the number of rural crashes increased by 4 percent (compared to a 1 percent increase overall in the region). In the Permian Basin region, the number of crashes increased by 11 percent (compared to a 4 percent decrease overall in the region).
  • ​Changes were even more prominent for crashes that involved CMVs and, in particular, for rural crashes that involved CMVs. For rural crashes that involved CMVs, there was a 34 percent decrease in the Barnett Shale region, a 61 percent increase in the Eagle Ford Shale region, and a 52 percent increase in the Permian Basin region. By comparison, there was a 9 percent decrease in all other 175 counties in the state.
  • ​For rural CMV crashes, changes in the relative number of crashes were larger as the severity of the injuries worsened. For example, in the Eagle Ford Shale region, there was a 77 percent increase in the number of fatal, incapacitating, and non-incapacitating injury crashes (compared to a 61 percent increase for all rural CMV crashes). For fatal crashes, the increase was 76 percent. In the Permian Basin region, there was a 57 percent increase in the number of fatal, incapacitating, and non-incapacitating injury crashes (compared to a 52 percent increase for all rural CMV crashes). For fatal crashes, the increase was 88 percent. The exception to this trend was the Barnett Shale region, where there was a 26 percent decrease in the number of fatal, incapacitating, and non-incapacitating injury crashes (compared to a 34 percent decrease for all crashes). For fatal crashes, the decrease was 37 percent.
  • ​Relative changes in the number of crashes on state highways were similar to those found for all highways. The changes were not uniform either by crash location and type of vehicles involved or by injury severity. There were also significant differences geographically within each region. Overall, the percentage of crashes occurring on state highways increased. For all crashes, the increase was from 54 to 56 percent. For fatal, incapacitating, and non-incapacitating injury crashes, the increase was from 59 to 61 percent. For fatal crashes, the increase was from 74 to 76 percent. These percentages were higher for rural roads. For example, for rural CMV crashes, the percentage of crashes on state highways decreased slightly from 78 to 77 percent. For fatal, incapacitating, and non-incapacitating injury crashes, this percentage increased from 90 to 91 percent. For fatal crashes, it decreased slightly but stayed around 96 percent.
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